- EIC - http://www.eiconline.org -

History

In 1988, EIC and CBS joined forces to produce and air a major primetime celebrity campaign, “AIDS Facts for Life,” which ran nightly on CBS stations across the country for three years.

EIC has also created and supported efforts to support industry professionals, in order to educate and protect them from the ravages of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. In 1987, the industry’s first AIDS workplace resource center was established by a joint effort of EIC and the Entertainment Industry Referral and Assistance Center (EIRAC). When EIC developed its first volume of Spotlight on Depiction of Health and Social Issues in 1993, a resource encyclopedia of depiction suggestions for entertainment creators, a chapter was devoted to the responsible and accurate depiction of HIV/AIDS.

To further support and protect its entertainment industry constituency, EIC engaged its programs in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Business Responds to AIDS/Labor Responds to AIDS (BRTA/LRTA) program, which educates labor unions on practical methods for dealing with HIV and AIDS in the workplace, including the sensitive treatment of those who are infected with HIV and have developed AIDS, as well as scientific information on the disease to decrease stigma brought about my misinformation, and to protect individual workers from risking infection unnecessarily. EIC brought BRTA/LRTA to Los Angeles, Orlando, Las Vegas and New York City to brief entertainment professionals. BRTA/LRTA was quickly accepted and integrated into training programs at many different entertainment production venues.

The popularity of the BRTA/LRTA program within the industry led EIC to join together in 1998 for a new national effort, co-produced by United Way and PRIDE. The “Youth Performing Arts Institute on HIV and AIDS Awareness” brought together 500 acting students from across the country to work with industry creators and actors, as well as health experts, to develop AIDS performances for their local communities.

These days, most people are aware of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and the resultant disease AIDS, but many people are still mislead by popular fallacies surrounding the diseases.